Treatment Diaries

While you all know that I am a big advocate of reaching out and sharing our stories via blogs and other social networks, I am also conscious that for many people, sharing themselves in this way is not something they feel comfortable with. I can remember back to when I started this blog a year and half ago, I was so careful to keep all traces of who I was out of the public domain and to remain anonymous. Gradually, I revealed more of who I was and “came out”, inspired by all the other wonderful women who were loud and proud in their cancer survivorship.

However, for those who wish to remain private, yet would still like to write about their experiences, there are websites dedicated to allowing them to do just this. I came across a new one last week, called Treatment Diaries.

TreatmentDiaries.com is a forum that provides a REAL information exchange between people with like medical conditions. Supporting the need for knowledge and support is vital when coping with a chronic condition. People need answers and want to hear about others experiencing similar challenges. The site allows people to keep a diary of important information and then share and exchange this information with other people in need when it matters most. Unlike other websites, users can control their privacy and remain completely anonymous should they so wish. They can also use the newest easy-to-use tools to write in their medical diary and share their experiences with whomever they choose.

“We were inspired by REAL stories of people struggling with medical conditions and treatments and the overwhelming desire to connect and exchange ideas with others facing similar circumstances. Finding and sharing genuine information and experiences is a powerful thing. Our goal is to give you the tool to do just that.” say founders Mike and Amy.

There’s something especially therapeutic about hearing real stories from people who genuinely share the same medical condition as you do, have the same questions that seemingly go unanswered by providers or just to know there’s other people out there with the same anxieties, fears and frustrations.

“A phone call from the doctor right before the 4th of July weekend stating, “the news is not good for you, you have Melanoma,” sent our founder into a state of anxiety. “You have a rare autoimmune disorder and there’s not much out there on it,” rang an OBGYN’s voice to a pregnant woman, expecting her second child and not knowing what it meant for her or her unborn. “Your father has large b-cell lymphoma in the brain,” sent a man into a frantic maze of “Googling.” Web searching can only take you so far. The source for quality information on chronic conditions can be found in the diaries of those willing to share it. That’s why a few people in rural Virginia started TreatmentDiaries.com.”

The site is a forum that provides a REAL information exchange between people with like medical conditions. Supporting the need for knowledge and support is vital when coping with a chronic condition. People need answers and want to hear about others experiencing similar challenges. Each day, people can write about medication, diet or whatever happened at the latest doctor appointment. Writing about it, public or private, can create a sense of hope and optimism. Finding someone across the country, or even the world, to share it with can take that level of coping to a whole new height.

“We hope people can use this free online tool to anonymously connect, share and inspire others to face life’s chronic conditions. We call it shared healing.”

Unlike other sites focused on just one condition, on TreatmentDiaries.com you can track multiple conditions and treatments, all at once, neatly in separate diaries. Make quality, lifelong connections with people who share the same condition as you. This is what makes the site authentic and valuable. No fuss, anonymous, worthy connections.

For more information on what TreatmentDiaries.com is all about, go to http://www.treatmentdiaries.com/about.aspx

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